Camel Cigarettes

Consumer Protection


Janice Garrett - Director of Consumer Protection Unit

Caroline Smith - Consumer Protection Unit - Hampshire County

Consumer Protection Unit intern Eli Baer at Greenfield Community College financial literacy "Reality Fair" 

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Facing Foreclosure?

Contact HAPhousing

Hampshire County Office

20 Hampton Avenue, Suite 185, Northampton, MA  01060

(413) 584-8495 • Fax: (413) 586-3571

Hours: M,T,Th,F, 9am-noon and 1-4pm; closed Wed

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Daily Hamsphire Gazette: "DA's Consumer Protection Division increases efforts to help the little guy"

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Consumer Protection video PSAs

 

 

  

 

 

(Click logos to visit CFPB and CPSC websites.)

 

 

 

 

 

  (Click for the latest recalls.)    

 

  

  

 

US. Government's Everyday Guide to Consumer Protection

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MONEY WIRING SCAMS

Money wiring scams continue to hurt our consumers in Western Massachusetts. The scam shows up in many different forms, but they all have one thing in common: the consumer is asked to use a money wiring service to send cash for one reason or another.

Lottery, Sweepstakes, Job applications, Overpayment, Relationship, Mystery shopper, Online auction sales, Apartment rentals, Advance Fee loans, Family emergency or a Friend in Need

SCAMMERS may ask you to send money in order to receive a big cash prize & even give you a Cashier’s Check to cover your “taxes” and “fees."

-You might apply for a job online, and your new “employer,” who you haven’t met, sends you a check to set up your new office, asking you to deposit the money into your private account and wire money to the “main office supply company” to have your office supplies sent to you.

-Some consumers have received a frightening call in the middle of the night from someone posing as their grandchild who’s in trouble and needs money wired to them right away. 

The bottom line is once you deposit the check into your personal bank account, take cash out and wire the money to someone, somewhere-you are responsible for the cash you took out of your account, even if you fell for a scam.

SCAMMERS like to get paid using money wiring services because it’s fast; the money is usually picked up in cash and in person making it hard to recover.

The Office of the Attorney General issued the following press release on the Grandparent Scam

http://www.mass.gov/ago/news-and-updates/press-releases/2012/2012-08-30-grandparent-scams.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Facing  

 

  • Facing Foreclosure?

    Contact the HomeCorps Hotline at (617) 573-5333

    For the Massachusetts Attorney General's Homecorps webpage, click HERE

 

 

 

 

 

Other useful links to Massachusetts Office of the Attorney General programs:

HomeCorps Borrower Representation Initiative

HomeCorps Borrower Recovery Initiative

HomeCorps Crisis Response Innovation Grants

HomeCorps Municipal and Community Restoration Grants

Western Massachusetts Foreclosure Prevention Centers

The Valley Community Development Corporation

Franklin County Regional Housing and Redevelopment Authority

HAPhousing

The Consumer Protection  Unit is one of the local consumer programs throughout the Commonwealth working in cooperation with the Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office.

Consumer Protection staff are trained to mediate complaints through an informal process involving letters and telephone calls from the consumer and the business, in an effort to reach a mutually agreeable settlement. If Consumer Protection staff are unable to resolve your complaint, staff members will discuss the option of redress through small claims court, face-to-face mediation or a private attorney.

CONSUMER PROTECTION COMPLAINT FORM

Click HERE to fill out a Consumer Protection Complaint form.
Forms can be submitted using the following methods:

  • Print out the completed form, and any related documents and mail it to:
    Northwestern District Attorney
    Consumer Protection Unit
    1 Gleason Plaza
    Northampton MA 01060
  • Or Fax to: 413-584-3635
    If you have any difficulty filling out the form please contact us 413-586-9225 or email to  NWD.CPU@MassMail.State.MA.US
    Note: The Consumer Protection Unit does not provide legal advice or opinions.
  • Password breaches – What to do

    June 22, 2016

    Here are some valuable reminders for everyone: 

    • Use multi-factor authentication, when it’s available.Multi-factor authentication adds another layer of protection against attacks. What’s multi-factor authentication? To log in, you must combine something you know (like a password), with an additional factor, which is usually something you have (like a code texted to a mobile phone) or something you are (like a fingerprint). More and more companies are offering it.
    • Make your password long, strong and complex. That means at least twelve characters, with three different “character classes” (uppercase, lowercase, numbers, symbols). It’s best to put non-lowercase letters in the middle of your password. Also, avoid common words, phrases or information in your passwords. And if you’re not sure if you’ve been affected by recent breaches (such as LinkedIn, Myspace and Tumblr), it’s safest to change your passwords.
    • Select security questions where only you know the answer. Don’t use questions whose answers can be found through online public records searches – like your birthplace or your mother’s maiden name. Don’t use questions with a limited number of responses that an attacker can easily guess – like the color of your first car.

    If your username and password have been exposed in a breach, take these steps right away:

    • Change your password. If possible, also change your username. If you can’t login, contact the company. Ask them how you can recover or shut down the account.
    • If you use the same (or similar) password for other accounts, change them too.
    • Check your accounts. If the password and username were for a financial site – or even if a credit card number was stored on the site – look for charges you don’t recognize.

    For more tips, check out the FTC’s advanced password tips and tricks and our guidance on computer security. If your personal information is misused, visit IdentityTheft.gov to report identity theft and get a personal recovery plan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IRS Warns Consumers of Possible Scams Relating to Orlando Mass Shooting

IR-2016-89, June 17, 2016

WASHINGTON ― The Internal Revenue Service today issued a consumer alert about possible fake charity scams emerging due to last weekend’s mass shooting in Orlando, Fla., and encouraged taxpayers to seek out recognized charitable groups.

When making donations to assist victims of last weekend’s terrible tragedy, there are simple steps taxpayers can take to ensure their hard-earned money goes to legitimate charities. IRS.gov has the tools taxpayers need to quickly and easily check out the status of charitable organizations.

While there has been an enormous wave of support across the country for the victims and families of Orlando, it is common for scam artists to take advantage of this generosity by impersonating charities to get money or private information from well-meaning taxpayers. Such fraudulent schemes may involve contact by telephone, social media, e-mail or in-person solicitations.

The IRS cautions donors to follow these tips:

  • Be sure to donate to recognized charities. 
  • Be wary of charities with names that are similar to familiar or nationally known organizations. Some phony charities use names or websites that sound or look like those of respected, legitimate organizations. The IRS website at IRS.gov has a search feature, Exempt Organizations Select Check, through which people may find qualified charities; donations to these charities may be tax-deductible.
  • Don’t give out personal financial information — such as Social Security numbers or credit card and bank account numbers and passwords — to anyone who solicits a contribution. Scam artists may use this information to steal a donor’s identity and money.
  • Don’t give or send cash. For security and tax record purposes, contribute by check or credit card or another way that provides documentation of the gift.
  • Consult IRS Publication 526, Charitable Contributions, available on IRS.gov. This free booklet describes the tax rules that apply to making tax-deductible donations. Among other things, it also provides complete details on what records to keep.

Bogus websites may solicit funds for victims of this tragedy. These sites frequently mimic the sites of, or use names similar to, legitimate charities, or claim to be affiliated with legitimate charities in order to persuade people to send money or provide personal financial information that can be used to steal identities or financial resources.

Additionally, scammers often send emails that steer recipients to bogus websites that appear to be affiliated with legitimate charitable causes.

Taxpayers suspecting fraud by email should visit IRS.gov and search for the keywords “Report Phishing.”

More information about tax scams and schemes may be found at IRS.gov using the keywords “scams and schemes.”

 

The FTC gets Rachel the Robocaller… again

 

Today, the FTC and the state of Florida announced a lawsuit against Life Management Services, a company that the FTC says is behind hundreds of thousands of these calls.

According to the FTC, Life Management Services swindled people out of their money by offering two types of phony debt relief: credit card interest rate reduction services and credit card debt elimination services. The company promised lower interest rates or government funds to pay off debt, and asked people to make initial payments ranging from $500 to $20,000. But almost no one got the help that was promised.

This is one of six recent FTC cases that focus on illegal robocalls. How does the FTC build these cases? One critical tool is the FTC’s honeypot -- a large bank of phone lines designed to attract robocalls. That lets FTC investigators interact with robocallers, record the calls, and make undercover purchases. The FTC uses its honeypot to identify companies placing illegal calls and collect evidence of their illegal activities. It was particularly useful in the Life Management case announced today.

So, what do you do if you get another unwanted robocall?

  • Hang up. Don’t respond in any way. Pressing buttons to get you taken off a list could result in more unwanted calls.
  • Block the caller’s number. You have a few options forblocking unwanted calls, including call-blocking devices, mobile apps, cloud-based services, and services provided by your phone carrier.
  • Report it to the FTC at www.donotcall.gov or 1-888-382-1222.

Read on for more info and tips about robocalls.

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Read more from the FTC HERE about the "federal student tax" scam.

Student debt relief schemes targeted by FTC

 

Do you have a lot of student debt? Wish it would disappear? You’re not alone. Scammers know that people are struggling with debt. They’re targeting borrowers with phony student loan debt relief schemes that can make things worse.

Today the FTC and the State of Florida announced lawsuits against two student loan debt relief schemes — Consumer Assistance Project and Student Aid Center. The FTC also announced a settlement in a case we wrote about earlier this year.

According to the FTC, Consumer Assistance Project and Student Aid Center promised to get people’s loans forgiven or significantly reduced. Consumer Assistance targeted people online and over the phone, claiming it would get relief through government programs or by disputing loans. Student Aid Center used radio ads, text blasts, and featured ads in search results to promote “Obama Loan Forgiveness.”

But people who paid the companies didn’t get their loans forgiven or reduced. At best, the companies got people’s loans put into deferment or forbearance, where loan payments are postponed but the interest owed on them can keep growing. Student Aid Center made some situations worse by telling people to stop contacting their lenders and pay the company instead. People often ended up paying thousands, but didn’t get the promised relief.

Student loan forgiveness programs are available in very limited circumstances. You can apply for debt relief yourself; you don’t need to pay a company. The FTC has new education materials to help borrowers:

  • Student Loan Debt Relief explains how to spot a debt relief scheme, and what people struggling with student loans can do themselves.
  • Maria and Rafael Learn the Signs of a Debt Relief Scamtells the story of a couple trying to repay debt they accumulated for their daughter’s college education. It’s the latest in a series of graphic novels to raise awareness about scams targeting Latino communities.
  • This list shows every company and individual ever banned from providing debt relief and mortgage assistance relief services by an FTC order.
 

Scammers can fake caller ID info

Your phone rings. You recognize the number, but when you pick up, it’s someone else. What’s the deal?

Scammers are using fake caller ID information to trick you into thinking they are someone local, someone you trust – like a government agency or police department, or a company you do business with – like your bank or cable provider. The practice is called caller ID spoofing, and scammers don’t care whose phone number they use. One scammer recently used the phone number of an FTC employee.

Don’t rely on caller ID to verify who’s calling. It can be nearly impossible to tell whether the caller ID information is real. Here are a few tips for handling these calls:

  • If you get a strange call from the government, hang up. If you want to check it out, visit the official (.gov) website for contact information. Government employees won’t call out of the blue to demand money or account information.
  • Don’t give out — or confirm — your personal or financial information to someone who calls.
  • Don’t wire money or send money using a reloadable card. In fact, never pay someone who calls out of the blue, even if the name or number on the caller ID looks legit.
  • Feeling pressured to act immediately? Hang up. That’s a sure sign of a scam.

Want more tips for avoiding scams? Check out 10 Ways to Avoid Fraud.

If you’ve received a call from a scammer, with or without fake caller ID information, report it to the FTC and the FCC.

Tagged with: personal informationphonescamspoof
Blog Topics: 

Privacy & Identity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Don't be fooled! The IRS won't call you and make demands, DA Sullivan explains.


Vets targeted by debt collection scams can get help.

How to protect yourself from scams.


Consumer Protection Unit's Janice Garrett and Caroline Smith with Assistant Attorney General Ann Lynch in South Deerfield, Greenfield and Erving

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click HERE for more information.

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Five Easy Ways to Spot a Scam Phone Call

IRS Special Edition Tax Tip 2014-18, September 2, 2014                                                 

The IRS continues to warn the public to be alert for telephone scams and offers five tell-tale warning signs to tip you off if you get such a call. These callers claim to be with the IRS. The scammers often demand money to pay taxes. Some may try to con you by saying that you’re due a refund. The refund is a fake lure so you’ll give them your banking or other private financial information.

These con artists can sound convincing when they call. They may even know a lot about you. They may alter the caller ID to make it look like the IRS is calling. They use fake names and bogus IRS badge numbers. If you don’t answer, they often leave an “urgent” callback request.

The IRS respects taxpayer rights when working out payment of your taxes. So, it’s pretty easy to tell when a supposed IRS caller is a fake. Here are five things the scammers often do but the IRS will not do. Any one of these five things is a sign of a scam. The IRS does not:

  1. Call you to demand immediate payment. We will not call about taxes you owe without first mailing you a bill.
     
  2. Demand that you pay taxes without giving you the chance to question or appeal the amount they say you owe.
     
  3. Require you to use a certain payment method for your taxes, such as a prepaid debit card.
     
  4. Ask for credit or debit card numbers over the phone.
     
  5. Threaten to bring in local police or other law-enforcement to have you arrested for not paying.

If you get a phone call from someone claiming to be from the IRS and asking for money, here’s what to do:

  • If you know you owe taxes or think you might owe, call the IRS at 800-829-1040 to talk about payment options. You also may be able to set up a payment plan online at IRS.gov.
     
  • If you know you don’t owe taxes or have no reason to believe that you do, report the incident to TIGTA at 1.800.366.4484 or at www.tigta.gov.
     
  • If phone scammers target you, also contact the Federal Trade Commission at FTC.gov. Use their “FTC Complaint Assistant” to report the scam. Please add "IRS Telephone Scam" to the comments of your complaint.

Remember, the IRS currently does not use unsolicited email, text messages or any social media to discuss your personal tax issues. For more information on reporting tax scams, go to www.irs.govand type “scam” in the search box.

Tips from the IRS

Tips to Protect Your Personal Information While Online

IRS Security Awareness Tax Tip Number 7, January 4, 2016                              

The IRS, the states and the tax industry urge you to be safe online and remind you to take important steps to help protect your tax and financial information and guard against identity theft. Treat your personal information like cash – don’t hand it out to just anyone.

Your Social Security number, credit card numbers, and bank and utility account numbers can be used to steal your money or open new accounts in your name. Every time you are asked for your personal information think about whether you can really trust the request. In an effort to steal your information, scammers will do everything they can to appear trustworthy.

The IRS has teamed up with state revenue departments and the tax industry to make sure you understand the dangers to your personal and financial data. Taxes. Security. Together. Working in partnership with you, we can make a difference.

Here are some best practices you can follow to protect your tax and financial information:

Give personal information over encrypted websites only. If you’re shopping or banking online, stick to sites that use encryption to protect your information as it travels from your computer to their server. To determine if a website is encrypted, look for “https” at the beginning of the web address (the “s” is for secure). Some websites use encryption only on the sign-in page, but if any part of your session isn’t encrypted, the entire account and your financial information could be vulnerable. Look for https on every page of the site you’re on, not just where you sign in.

Protect your passwords. The longer the password, the tougher it is to crack.  Use at least 10 characters; 12 is ideal for most home users. Mix letters, numbers and special characters. Try to be unpredictable – don’t use your name, birthdate or common words. Don’t use the same password for many accounts.  If it’s stolen from you – or from one of the companies with which you do business – it can be used to take over all your accounts. Don’t share passwords on the phone, in texts or by email.  Legitimate companies will not send you messages asking for your password.  If you get such a message, it’s probably a scam. Keep your passwords in a secure place, out of plain sight.

Don’t assume ads or emails are from reputable companies. Check out companies to find out if they are legitimate. When you’re online, a little research can save you a lot of money and reduce your security risk. If you see an ad or an offer that looks too good, take a moment to check out the company behind it. Type the company or product name into your favorite search engine with terms like “review,” “complaint” or “scam.” If you find bad reviews, you’ll have to decide if the offer is worth the risk. If you can’t find contact information for the company, take your business and your financial information elsewhere. The fact that a site features an ad for another site doesn’t mean that it endorses the advertised site, or is even familiar with it.

Don’t overshare on social media – Do a web search of your name and review the results. Most likely, the results will turn up your past addresses, the names of people living in the household as well social media accounts and your photographs. All of these items are valuable to identity thieves. Even a social media post boasting of a new car can help thieves bypass security verification questions that depend on financial data that only you should know. Think before you post!

Back up your files. No system is completely secure. Copy important files and your federal and state tax returns onto a removable disc or a back-up drive, and store it in a safe place. If your computer is compromised, you’ll still have access to your files.

Save your tax returns and records. Your federal and state tax forms are important financial documents you may need for many reasons, ranging from home mortgages to college financial. Print out a copy and keep in a safe place. Make an electronic copy in a safe spot as well. These steps also can help you more easily prepare next year’s tax return. If you store sensitive tax and financial records on your computer, use a file encryption program to add an additional layer of security should your computer be compromised.

To learn additional steps you can take to protect your personal and financial data, visit Taxes. Security. Together. You also can read Publication 4524, Security Awareness for Taxpayers.

Each and every taxpayer has a set of fundamental rights they should be aware of when dealing with the IRS. These are your Taxpayer Bill of Rights. Explore your rights and our obligations to protect them on IRS.gov.

Additional IRS Resources:

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Consumer RESOURCES

AUTOMOBILES                

Massachusetts Office of the Attorney General:                                                                                 

Buying or Leasing a Vehicle

Tips on Used Car Buying

Getting the most from your Car's Warranty

Massachusetts Consumers’ Coalition:

Massachusetts Department of Transportation

Registry of Motor Vehicles          

Center for Auto Safety          

Auto Safety, Recalls, Service Bulletins

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

Auto Recalls, Highway & Vehicle Safety Standards, Crash Test

CREDIT AND DEBT

Guide to Consumer Credit

Credit               

Consumer Credit and Fair Debt Collection

Money and Credit

CFPB

Credit and Loans

My Money.gov

CHARITIES

FAQs about Charities

Charities and Charitable Giving

Wise Giving Alliance for Charities and Donors

CREDIT REPORTS

Free Annual Credit Report

COMPUTERS AND INTERNET PRIVACY

Computers and the Internet Privacy and Security

DO NOT CALL REGISTRY

National “Do not Call” Registry

National Do Not Call Registry

Truth about Wireless Phones & the National Do-Not-Call List     

FUNERAL PLANNING

 Consumers Guide to Planning a Funeral

 Funerals- A Consumer Guide

Complying With the Funeral Rule

HOME IMPROVEMENT

Home Improvement

MA Guide to Home Improvement

Construction Supervisor license verification site

IDENTITY THEFT

Identity Theft

Identity Theft

Create an Identity Theft Report

Identity Theft

Taking Charge: What to do if your identity is stolen

Medical Identity Theft

 

LANDLORD AND TENANT INFORMATION

Landlord and Tenant Law

LEGAL

Franklin County Bar Association

Referrals

Hampshire County Bar Association

Referrals

Massachusetts Bar Association Referral         866-627-7577

Dial a Lawyer Program

Free legal questions answered:

1st Wednesday of the month    5:30- 7:30                        (617) 338- 0610

Community Legal Aid

 Legal Aid to Low-Income & Elderly Residents of Western MA

National Consumer Law Center

Advocacy Organization

MA Office of Consumer Affairs and Business Regulations

 

MORTGAGES

Massachusetts Office of Attorney General:     

 Home & Housing

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau                                                                                           Trouble Paying Your Mortgage-Explore options  

 Consumer Financial Protection Bureau                                                                 

Valley Community Development Corporation (Valley CDC):

Building Community through Housing and Business Development 

Franklin County Housing and Redevelopment Center:

Consumer Action Housing Help:

Foreclosure Prevention Guide

Massachusetts Housing Court Department

Frequently Asked Questions

RECALL INFORMATION

US Consumer Product Safety Commission:    

Recent Recalls

SHOPPING RIGHTS

Massachusetts Office of the Attorney General:   

Retail Rights

Shopping Rights

VETERANS

Massachusetts Attorney General's Resource Guide for Veterans

WORKPLACE RIGHTS

Workplace Rights & Responsibilities

Documents